The nearly-forgotten Kilpatrick module format.

Kilpatrick has his own module format.

Announced last year. Almost totally ignored, except for one thread on Muff’s forum, containing much whining.

Kilpatrick is doing what all the others should have done from the beginning, goddammit:

* No power cables, the modules plug directly into a power backplane. Easy to install.
* Captive mounting screws that don’t fall out and get lost. With socket heads.
* 15v rails with ample current capacity. Each module has its own local regulation.
* Separate analog and digital grounds.
* Banana jacks, color coded.
* A consistent single 4U panel size. Sized for human hands. No Euro micro-panel weirdness.

And his prices are reasonable, which is nothing short of miraculous. About one-third of what Buchla charges for roughly the same capabilities.

He needs to aggressively market this, and just as important, he must encourage third parties to make compatible modules. Or it will fail. That would be very sad. Too much of the modular market is a garbage pit of stupid, repetitive, and cheap.

Now I’m really pissed off. Kept my mouth shut before, but no longer. Look at the little bastards, earlier in that thread, nitpicking and naysaying, despite having never actually seen or tried any of it. Muff, I keep telling you that your forum is too tolerant of trolls and idiots, and this is a perfect example.

First there was the “rainboard”……

….and now we have the “Seaboard”.

It’s been announced all over the place: BBC (who stupidly call it a “sound system”), Synthtopia, Sonic State.

Predictably, it’s not yet in production, much less has a price tag attached — but already nerds are complaining about the price. Plus, the continued use of the aging MIDI protocol will limit its interfacing abilities to software or other synth electronics. I wish them luck, they’ll need it.

I almost forgot to mention the German made Endeavour controller. It, apparently, is actually shipping.

What came before the Fairlight?

All the way back in 1972, Tony Furse managed to get funding to build a polyphonic digital/analog synth. That was the Qasar.

He built precisely two prototypes–the finished machine would have been far too costly for the era, so no investors came forward. Tony persisted, though, and developed it into a primitive sampling machine with dual 6800 microprocessors (brand-new on the market) in 1978. That machine, the Qasar M8, eventually was commercialized as the Fairlight CMI. (More history here.)